Tracking times and cycles for multi-engine aircraft

From ZuluLog Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Contents

Introduction

For single-engine aircraft, there's only a single engine tach reading, or a single number of engine cycles. But when you're working with multi-engine aircraft, you'll want to track the tach time or engine cycles independently for each engine. This section shows you how to do that.


Engine #1 is Primary

The first thing to remember is this: When you're entering your starting and ending engine tach/cycles on the flight entry screen (or the latest engine tach/cycles on the maintenance entry screen), you will always enter numbers for engine #1. It does not matter which engine you consider to be engine #1, but you'll need to be consistent. We will demonstrate this with an example.


Example: Twin-engine aircraft N99999

Let's say you're tracking N99999, an aircraft with two turbine engines. Let's also say that as of March 1, 2015:

Component Setup

  1. Define an airframe record for N99999 if you haven't yet. (Leave "Scheduled By" as "None".)
  2. Under N99999, create a Total Time record of 2371 Engine Tach/Cycles as of March 1, 2015. (See the previous examples if you're unclear on how to do this.)
  3. Under N99999, create an Engine record for engine #1. (Leave "Scheduled By" as "None".)
  4. Under N99999, create an Engine record for engine #2. (Leave "Scheduled By" as "None".)
  5. Under engine #2 (N99999 -> Engine #2), create a Total Time record of 970 Engine Tach/Cycles as of March 1, 2015.

Operation Record Setup

  1. Go to Aircraft Logbook -> Add Entry.
  2. Enter March 1, 2015 in the Date field and N99999 in the Aircraft ID field.
  3. Select Operation from the Category drop-down.
  4. Enter 2371 in the Engine Tach/Cycles field. (This is the total number of cycles for Engine #1 as of March 1, 2015 -- the same number we entered in the component definition above.)
  5. Save the record.

Check Totals

  1. Go to Aircraft/Component Status and expand N99999.
  2. Click the label in the right-hand column for Total Time - Engine Tach/Cycles. You should see that the latest aircraft operation is on March 1, 2015, and the total cycles for the primary engine on this date (labeled "cmp tot use") is 2371.
  3. Dismiss the pop-up panel, expand Engine #2, and click the label in the right-hand column for Engine #2's Total Time - Engine Tach/Cycles.
  4. You should see that the latest "primary" reading as of March 1, 2015 is 2371, and the total number of cycles for Engine #2 on this date is 970 (labeled "cmp tot use").

Enter a new operation

So far so good. Now let's enter an aircraft operation record and make sure the totals on each engine advance as expected. Let's say the engines on N99999 were cycled 3 times on March 7, 2015.

  1. Go to Aircraft Logbook -> Add Entry.
  2. Enter March 7, 2015 in the Date field and N99999 in the Aircraft ID field.
  3. Select Operation from the Category drop-down.
  4. Enter 2374 in the Engine Tach/Cycles field and save the record.

Check Updated Totals

  1. Go to Aircraft/Component Status and expand N99999.
  2. Click the label in the right-hand column for Total Time - Engine Tach/Cycles. You should see that the latest aircraft operation is now March 7, 2015, and the total cycles for the primary engine on this date is 2374.
  3. Dismiss the pop-up panel, expand Engine #2, and click the label in the right-hand column for Engine #2's Total Time - Engine Tach/Cycles.
  4. You should see that the latest "primary" reading as of March 7, 2015 is now 2374, and the total number of cycles for Engine #2 on this date is 973. This is 970 + 3, which is exactly what we expected to see. (See Calculation of total aircraft times if you're unclear on how this was calculated.)

Tracking independent engine cycles or tach time

The system assumes, for convenience, that all engines on an aircraft are usually cycled together. Whenever the number of cycles (or the number of tach hours) diverges between engines, simply update the appropriate Total Time record on Engine #2 (or Engine #3, etc). This will allow the system to keep track of each engine's cycles independently.


Continue to Replacing an aircraft's tach meter or Hobbs meter

Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox